Skagit County Library Dilemma

2 thoughts on “Skagit County Library Dilemma”

  1. It looks like that campaign was started when one of the libraries wasn’t even going to allow non-residents of the city to pay for a card in 2004. http://old.seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2002053425_library04m.html and
    http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/skagit-county-library-measure-loses-again/

    Sadly, it’s far from abnormal. I thought it was odd here in Macomb County, Michigan that it works much the same – each town has their own library. There are a handful that are a couple of townships together, and they have a coop where you can request books from one library to be sent to your library. Some will sell you a “non resident card,” but for $200 each, I doubt they are selling that many.

    The county south of us dissolved their county library system in 2015.

    When people think that they are “reading” because they are playing with social media on Facebook, they can’t comprehend actually going to a library to actually read, much less paying for the ability for children (that aren’t related to them) to go do the same.

    1. Even though it seems odd to my experience, I was afraid this would be the case in other parts of the country. I guess it just strikes me as odd that it would happen, here, where things seem so progressive.

      $200 for a library card is the “I don’t want to deal with it” price. That’s ridiculous.

      Thanks for the link, BTW.

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