50 Years a Trekkie

Untitled photo

Last night marks the 50th anniversary of the first broadcast of Star Trek.  It premiered on September 8, 1966.  I watched a few minutes of that opening episode, but already had evening obligations to tour a cemetery with Dwight Moffit (more on that in another post.)  So, tonight, even though I’m on the road for a paddling trip, I’m going to hit the hotel’s wifi and stream that first episode, “The Man Trap,” and reflect on fifty years of Trekhood. Continue reading “50 Years a Trekkie”

The Hype Awakens

The Force Awakens Poster

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past six months, everyone knows that the latest movie in the Star Wars series opened last week. To say there was been hype would be a HUGE understatement. Coming out before Christmas, just about all of the stores were stocked with movie merchandise, and there were lots of advertising tie-ins.

The problem, of course, is that a movie might not live up to the hype. It could be as bad as, say, the Phantom Menace. Many fans were holding their breath, me being one of them. Despite the hype, bad things could happen. Continue reading “The Hype Awakens”

Gallabrae 2015

2015 Scottish Games at Furman-122

NOTE: I’m just now getting around to completing this post. This has been a very busy week.

Gallabrae – rhymes with Gallifrey, for the Whovians out there. It’s a made-up Gaellic term that’s supposed to mean “bold and daring” and “beautiful highlands.” It’s also the name that has come to symbolize the Greenville Scottish Games at Furman University. This year was the tenth anniversary of the games.

I hadn’t planned to attend the games this year. However, Laura’s plan for the day was to relax and read at the house. She needed the down time, but I’d been working around the house all week. I decided to head on up to Furman for the games. Continue reading “Gallabrae 2015”

The Bells of Europe

Cathedral Bell

Many years ago my brother Houston told me about a radio documentary entitled “The Bells of Europe,” which came out in 1973. Houston liked it so much that he ordered a cassette tape of the show, which I listened to, as well. It was an excellent show that documented the history of the bells of the cathedrals of Europe, from their creation to the destruction of many to build cannons for war.

The drama was the creation of Peter Leonhard Braun, a German radio pioneer. Braun’s intent was take radio outside of the studio. With audio recording equipment improving and becoming more portable, Braun wanted to explore the possibilities of creating audio documentaries on-site, and the Bells of Europe was the first of these documentaries.

Continue reading “The Bells of Europe”

Farewell Spock

Yesterday the world learned of the death of Leonard Nimoy, Mr. Spock of Star Trek fame. As you might imagine, there has already been a tremendous amount of eulogizing about a beloved character, actor, and human being. I don’t intend to repeat that, or post yet another image of the funeral scene from Wrath of … Continue reading Farewell Spock

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